Michael Haugen Jr. Joins Team Storm

BRIGHAM CITY, Utah – Storm Products is proud to announce that Michael Haugen Jr. has joined Team Storm. Haugen has won five Professional Bowling Association (PBA) Tour Titles including one major title at the 2008 Tournament of Champions and several PBA Regional titles. He has also earned three PBA50 titles including one major at the 2017 Senior U.S. Open.

Haugen has been a PBA Member since 1994 and competes on the PBA Tour and PBA50 Tour.

“For me personally, I’m glad to join Team Storm and be on Bill Chrisman’s team.” Haugen said. “He does a lot for bowling – not just the tours. He supports all bowling from youth bowling to military bowling and more. There’s probably not a company or a person that gives back as much as him in our industry.”

Prior to joining Team Storm, Haugen chose to throw Storm and Roto Grip products exclusively on the PBA50 Tour.

“The majority of my bag has always been Storm and Roto Grip,” Haugen said.  “As a free agent, it gives me the best chance to win.”

Haugen recently locked up the PBA50 Player of the Year (POY) honor after his finish at the PBA50 Cup. This achievement makes him the second player to win PBA50 ROY and POY honors in consecutive years.

“Storm is excited to add Michael to our Team,” Gary Hulsenberg, Vice President of Business Development said. “He has been very loyal to our brand over the years as a free agent so it’s a natural fit to make things official. He has a great understanding of our equipment, our culture, and what we stand for. He will be a great teammate.”

Haugen’s love for bowling started at a young age on the weekends with his grandfather. At age 5, his grandfather thought he was big enough to bowl with him. They continued to bowl together throughout his young life and he was a huge part of his support system on and off the lanes.

“My grandfather was the most influential person in my life,” Haugen said. “He just meant everything to me. Not just in bowling but in life.”

It didn’t take long for Haugen to figure out what he wanted to do in his life. He knew that he wanted to be a professional bowler from a very young age. He set his goals high and bowled as much as he could. His family always taught him to work hard for whatever he wanted in life and to go get it.

“With anything you do, whether it’s going to medical school for seven years or anything else, it takes sacrifice and hard work to be successful,” Haugen said. “Very few people get lucky and just fall into it.”

For some time now, Haugen’s goals and plans have been focused on the PBA50 Tour. Though he felt he wasn't as competitive week to week as he would have liked on the PBA Tour, he feels he's competitive every week now.

In 2017, he won one title, made four TV shows and earned the PBA50 Rookie of the Year (ROY) title. After his rookie season, he set his goals a little higher.

“My first goal was to make every cut on the tour,” Haugen said. “My second goal was to win more. I won two tournaments this year. I also made 6 TV shows versus 4 the previous year. My final goal was to be Player of the Year (POY).”

When Haugen has some time off the lanes, he truly enjoys golfing with friends and especially his wife, Phuong Truong. He loves spending the time with her and he feels that when he’s golfing well, it’s good practice for the lanes as well.

“Honestly, if I’m chipping and putting with good touch and feel, that’ll translate to bowling for me,” Haugen said. “I don’t know why it does, it just does.”

Haugen is busy traveling to bowl regional events until the conclusion of the PBA50 Tour at the PBA50 Storm Invitational September 28-30. He is also excited to return to the PBA Tour this fall.

“I love to compete,” Haugen said. “I love to test myself against the best players in the world. I like going to different cities and meeting new people and trying to energize whether it’s the youth or the seniors at the pro-am trying to energize and grow the sport. I really enjoy that.”

 

 

 


PBA and FOX Sports Announce Multi-Year, Multi-Platform Deal; PBA Returns to Broadcast TV in 2019

Story from Bill Vint, PBA Media Relations. Link to original story on pba.com.

 

LOS ANGELES and CHICAGO – The Professional Bowlers Association (PBA) and FOX Sports today announced a multi-year, multi-platform agreement making FOX Sports the new television partner for the Go Bowling! PBA Tour starting in 2019. The package will bring a substantial schedule of live PBA events to television, including prime time events and a new bracket-style, multi-week PBA Playoffs tournament that concludes with a unique PBA championship finale. The announcement was made by PBA CEO and Commissioner Tom Clark and William Wanger, FOX Sports Executive VP of Programming, Live Operations and Research (see photo below).

“The PBA has been searching for the best possible broadcast partner to serve our fans, players and the bowling industry, and we have determined that partner is FOX Sports,” Clark said. “We are particularly excited that the PBA Tour returns to broadcast television, where it started 56 years ago, with shows on FOX next year.”

In 2019, FOX Sports will televise four PBA Tour shows on FOX and 25 on FS1 in a series of two-hour telecasts. All programs will also be streamed on FOX Sports GO. Details pertaining to the FOX Sports-PBA package regarding PBA Tour locations, dates and times, and the television announcing team will be released at a later date.

“FOX Sports is thrilled to add the highly rated PBA Tour to our extensive lineup, joining other sport partners including the NFL, the FIFA World Cup, MLB, NASCAR, MLS, UFC, NHRA, Supercross, USGA, college football and basketball, and others,” said Wanger. “We believe that adding a FOX Sports look and feel to bowling will help bring the sport to a whole new level.”

The PBA was represented in the transaction by Ed Desser of Desser Sports Media (www.desser.tv).

The agreement between FOX Sports and the PBA extends a non-stop television presence for professional bowling that began in 1962 with ABC Television’s 36 years of continuous coverage of the Pro Bowlers Tour and 38 consecutive years of coverage on ESPN, beginning with ESPN’s formation in 1979.

Both parties plan to supplement the broadcast and cable coverage of the PBA Tour’s premier events with live-streaming of preliminary rounds by PBA’s Xtra Frame online bowling channel as well as extensive use of the FOX Sports and PBA Network outlets including Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Instagram and their respective websites.

About FOX Sports

FOX Sports is the umbrella entity representing 21st Century FOX’s wide array of multi-platform US-based sports assets.  Built with brands capable of reaching more than 100 million viewers in a single weekend, FOX Sports includes ownership and interests in linear television networks, digital and mobile programming, broadband platforms, multiple web sites, joint-venture businesses and several licensing partnerships.  FOX Sports includes the sports television arm of the FOX Broadcasting Company; FS1, FS2; FOX Sports Regional Networks, their affiliated regional web sites and national programming; FOX Soccer Plus; FOX Deportes and FOX College Sports.  In addition, FOX Sports also encompasses FOX Sports Digital, which includes FOXSports.com and FOX Sports GO.  Also included in the Group are FOX’s interests in joint-venture businesses Big Ten Network and BTN 2Go, as well as a licensing agreement that established the FOX Sports Radio Network.

About the PBA

In 2018 the Professional Bowlers Association (PBA) celebrates its 60th anniversary. The PBA is an organization of more than 3,000 of the best bowlers from 27 countries who compete in Go Bowling! PBA Tour, PBA International Tour, PBA Regional Tour, PBA Women’s Regional and PBA50 Tour events. The 2018 season also marks the 59th consecutive year of nationally-televised competition, reaching bowling fans around the world who follow PBA activities through the PBA Network which includes Xtra Frame, the PBA’s exclusive online bowling channel, ESPN and CBS Sports Network, and the PBA on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. PBA sponsors include Barbasol, Brunswick, Ebonite International, GEICO, GoBowling.com, HotelPlanner.com, MOTIV, 900 Global, PBA Bowling Challenge Mobile Game, Storm Products and the United States Bowling Congress, among others. For more information, log on to www.pba.com.


12th Annual Storm | Domino's Pizza Cup SBS Korea Tournament

240 top players from around the world competed at the Hogye Sports Complex Bowling Center in Seoul, S. Korea December 16-21, 2017.

The event attracted Professional bowlers from Korea, Japan, and the United States, as well as several high-ranking amateurs from Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, and more.

Total Prize money was 160 Million Korean Won ($150,00 US Dollars) with 30,000,000 Korean Won (USD $28,400) to the winner.

The finalist to the TV Championship Round included two finalists from S. Korea, Sanpil Park and Heeyeo Yoon, plus Cherie Tan of Singapore, and Anthony Simonsen of the United States.

(shown left to right Anthony Simonsen, Heeyeo Yoon, Cherie Tan, and Sanpil Park, and KPBA representative)

 

This was a Major Championship which featured live local broadcasting and showcased several of the major sponsors such as Storm, Domino's Pizza, and Kegel, LLC.

(SBS SPORTS LIVE & COMPOSITE CHANNEL LIVE COVERAGE)

 

In the championship match, Anthony Simonsen defeated Heeyeo Yoon 268-223 to claim the top prize!

Anthony Simonsen, Champion

 

Storm co-owners Bill and Barb Chrisman were on hand throughout the entire tournament, and without their generosity this tournament would not be possible.

Bill and Barb Chrisman, Co-Owners of Storm Products, Inc.

 

Glimpse of the Victory Banquet which concluded the event. Title sponsors Storm Products, Inc. and Jinseung Trading Co. helped make this event a Major Championships for the KPBA, the Korean Professional Bowlers Association.

Mr. JP Jeon, CEO of Jinseung Trading Co. (left) with top finishers from the tournament

 

Congratulations to all who were involved to make this an amazing event!

 


The Storm Corner

If you watch the best in the world bowl on ESPN, you will see the best in our sport cover more boards on a lane, with more speed, than you and me. And you’ll often hear it said that the top professionals have a phenomenal ball roll. What does that mean? Don’t all of us who participate in the sport of bowling roll the ball, in some fashion? The answer is ‘yes’ but while we all roll the ball when we bowl, we all apply a different type of action to the ball. Some have more side roll and rotate more quickly. Others look like a top when they go down the lane, not the best professionals in the U.S., mind you. And we can talk about the ‘spinner style,’ which dominated the recent World Championships in Las Vegas, at a later date.

So, when we mention the term ‘ball roll’ we are referring to these three elements of how the ball rotates as it travels down the lane:

  1. Rev rate
  2. Axis rotation
  3. Axis tilt

Do you consider two-handed sensations like Jason Belmonte, Osku Palermaa and Kyle Troup to be “crankers?” If so, it is because of their high rev rate. Defined as how fast the ball rotates over a specific length of time, usually minutes, rev rate relates to the amount of energy transferred from your release to the bowling ball. Players who generate the most powerful strike balls do so with a strong, leveraged position, their fingers well below the equator of the ball. And they do so not only with a cupped wrist, and possibly bent elbow, but also through proper use of the strongest muscle group in their body, their legs! Try lifting a heavy suitcase with just your arms, and you’ll quickly realize how often you use your legs without even thinking about it.

To find your rev rate, you will need to use your camera on your phone or an appropriate app.  Watch the number of times your ball turns over in one second and multiply by that number by 60, as there are 60 seconds in a minute. Watch this great video below, too, for a better explanation:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yccbhBI-Yy0&feature=youtu.be

A cranker will have a rev rate of at least 400 rpms, or revolutions per minute. Tweeners have less hand action than the cranker, and will have between 200 and 400 rpms. The straightest players, the strokers, have less than 200 rpms. Which category do you fall in? Find out and you will be one step closer to fully understanding your game!

The second part of the ball roll formula is your axis rotation. This refers to the direction of your ball roll. A ball that rolls completely end-over-end is said the have 0 degrees axis rotation. Great for predictability, this heavy forward roll will give you great control on the backends, but generates little entry angle and often lacks carry power. Here is how to find your axis rotation at home:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I-btz1SpFtw

A player like Pete Weber has nearly the exact opposite. The 90 degree axis rotation generates maximum hook on the backend and yields unmatched power at the pins. This is most often referred to as the high risk-high reward type of roll. A majority of players, however, fall somewhere between these two extremes. A moderate amount of side roll is considered the optimum amount. Exhibited by nearly ¾ of the entire PBA tour, the 45 degree rotation will surely give you a nice combination of power and predictability.

The final ingredient of the recipe is axis tilt. To best describe axis tilt, imagine a top spinning on your desk or table. This type of roll, when equated to a bowling ball, would considered 90 degrees of tilt and would be seen only if the ball track were to be condensed to one very small point. On the converse, consider a ball track that covers the full circumference of the ball, all 27 inches of it, and you would have 0 degrees of tilt. Again, these are the extremes and nearly everyone falls in a comfortable range somewhere in-between! This is how to find your axis tilt:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fkRscXz5JTU

In closing, be sure to know your ball roll. Remember the three variables: rev rate, axis rotation, and axis tilt. The better you understand your game the easier it will be for you to select the proper ball and layout for each lane condition! And to learn more about Storm’s line of high performance equipment, spend some time on our website, www.stormbowling.com, or feel free to contact me via e-mail at stevek@stormbowling.com.


Stay In The Moment

The process... to stay within the moment.

BUT, how does one stay “within the moment”?

It seems to come so naturally for some, Weber, Belmonte, Federer, Nicklaus… any great performer, and it really doesn't matter the sport or disciple. Those who have “it” seem to carry some sort of unique power to always succeed.

Throughout my years of competition, the one thing I consistently witnessed from the best was their commitment to their process. To stay “within the moment”. What does this mean? We hear, “stay in the moment,” often, but how is it really accomplished?

Success is the result of proper execution. Proper execution is a result of being committed to staying focused. Our focus lies within your process which often leads to the ability to stay in the moment. This is accomplished by not allowing outside interference affect your performance and not allowing distraction to interrupt your flow. Distractions come in many forms. The #1 distraction is to be focused on the results. Humans are competitive. We are constantly measuring ourselves against society and against our peers. We want newer cars, bigger houses, nicer clothes, larger bank accounts, the list is endless. Why do we have these desires? The ability to understand this leads to the ability to understand why some can perform “within the moment” and why others can’t.

To be properly focused on the task at hand (the process), one must stay in the moment.

Not the past, no matter how far or immediate, nor the future. It takes great discipline to not be results oriented when we are competing. We can’t look ahead. It also takes great discipline to let go of the negative past results we have experienced. We can’t look behind either. This balancing act is exactly what the greats do to remain in the process. The mind is clear and quiet, the thoughts are purely on the action. It is a form of passive aggressiveness, to get exactly what you want to have and to “let” it happen. You must “allow” yourself to perform, you cannot “make” it happen. It doesn't work that way. It never has and it never will.

A drill that I have used with many of the players I coach is to learn to not watch the scores. This is much easier said than done, but if implemented fully, it will pay immediate dividends. In your next league/tournament, do not look at your score, nor recap, nor results, nor your opponent’s score, nor your friend's scores, nor your rivals scores. What does this drill achieve? Well, it teaches the mind and muscles to stay in the process.

The only shot of any importance is the next one. Nothing else matters.

Our mind knows when we are bowling well, we can feel it. Our mind knows when we are bowling bad, we feel that too. We do not need a number on a piece of paper to tell us what we already feel. Once you feel your body speaking to you and you learn to listen to it, you will then learn to be more honest with yourself. Honest with what you feel, and how to improve on that. The smallest of errors can be felt, things you would have never felt before. Removing the scores from being the dominant factor in how one self-assesses their performance teaches you that you are trying 100% EVERY shot. You are not allowing distraction or the fear of results to affect your performance. You are living in the moment. You are leaving it all out there. No matter what your results are, you tried your best, and that is all we can truly ask of ourselves.