Photo Credit Stars and Strikes Bowling News magazine

USBC Hall of Famer Don Scudder wasn’t in it for Money or Fame

If you have been a competitive bowler over the years, you probably know the name Don Scudder. He is a USBC Hall of Famer from Cincinnati, Ohio, and is one of the most decorated amateur bowlers you will find. Don’s national championships span across several decades. In fact, Don Scudder has won the two oldest tourneys in the US having won the Petersen Classic in 2014 (at age 62) and the ABC Singles title in 1996.

Don’s ties to Storm and the brands of Storm are significant, too. He used the Pacific Storm while earning two eagles and shooting 823 at the ABC National Championships in Salt Lake City, Utah. And at the famed Petersen Classic outside of Chicago, Illinois, Don used the Roto Grip Uproar and Storm Mix while earning the coveted Petersen Classic title just seven years ago. Interesting to note, too, is that Don has shot 1600 four different times throughout his career there. And what’s even more impressive is that, for more than 40 years now, he has a lifetime average of 185, at what is known as one of the toughest and most demanding events in the country.

Did you ever turn pro? Or consider it, at least?

DS: Yes I did. I turned pro in 1985, because I wanted to bowl a few Regional tournaments. I had won a Pro Regional tournament in Taylor Michigan in 1982, as an amateur. Pro Tour rules stated that I was unable to bowl any more Pro tournaments until I joined and picked up a card.

At the time I was working full time for the State of Ohio. I was a weekend warrior. I did this for about 6 months, and dropped my card so I could bowl in the new Megabuck bowling tournaments that had just started in Las Vegas.

I had a chance of touring full time on the PBA in 1978.  A restaurant owner across the street from Western Bowl wanted to back me for a year so I could give it a try.

Eddie Jackson, Team USA Captain and eventual ABC Hall of Famer, elected 1989, sat down with me in 1978, and filled me in on the pitfalls of touring. Eddie knew I worked for the state. Eddie explained the money bowling on the tour verses working for the state was not worth the risk. In the end it was his common sense thinking that stopped me from getting a card and I stayed amateur until 1985 . To this day I thank Eddie as I retired at age 55, from the state with pension and health insurance in hand.

In 1996, you won $100,000 in the Mini-Eliminator, defeating Purvis Granger in an exciting finish….throwing a strike to win. How nervous were you stepping up in the tenth there with that kind of money on the line?

DS: When it got to the 10th frame in the title match needing a strike to win $100,000, I’d be lying if I told you I wasn’t nervous.

However, going back to the start of the week I was hardly able to walk much less bowl. Everything hard to believe happened that week, from starting my 1st two eliminator matches standing at the foul line, no approach, throwing each 1st ball in the middle of the lane at turtle speed and making the cut in both matches with clean games. In fact, prior to the show, I had bowled 11 clean games in making the telecast. In the title match games in the second frames I had splits that I failed to convert leaving me with two open frames for the entire week.  Still – unbelievable I had bowled and won this tournament with a bum knee that was caused by falling on ice in front of Western Bowl the Wednesday prior to the tournament beginning.

Back to the 10th frame the final game needing a strike, I remember telling myself this one is for the title. My mind did not think about the money. I wanted the title. In the 10th I did strike, along with a nine spare to finish the game. It was the happiest moment in my bowling life to win that title and that much money on TV with a bum knee.

On the show I remember striking in the 10th frame and yelling in celebration to my friends who were in the stands “Get me a Bud Light”. I wanted to start a party. Denny the show’s commentator had heard earlier I was on the ABC HOF Ballot for the past several years.  After striking to win $100,000, Denny celebrating with me commented “HOF fame committee take notice”, and at the same time I yelled, “Get me a Bud Light”. It was very funny indeed. HOF must not have taken notice, as I did not get elected into the HOF until 1999.

Winning the Eliminator tournament, there was more. I also received a full expense paid entry fee with airplane fare and hotel to bowl in a tournament in the Netherlands to be held in March 1996. I bowled and finished 4th in the singles, and was second with Ron Pollard in the doubles.

It’s been 25 years now since you set the record Team All Events score in Salt Lake City in 1996…and won the singles there too…. What do you remember from that event and what did it mean to you to win two Eagles?

DS: Our team, Pollard’s Bowl, won the ABC Team All events on the 25th and 26th of April 1996; I don’t think I will ever forget. Our team event in Salt Lake City, Utah on the 25th, found us shooting 3222.  I was low with 620.

Starting off in the doubles Ron and Rick Pollard bowled a pair of 290 games, totaling 580, a record. I believe it is still a record at USBC in the doubles. The Pollards finished 3rd, in the doubles that year.

My doubles partner, Bill Spigner bowled games of 244, 239, and 290, for a 775 total. I shot 654, only one open for a 1429 total.

I did not have a ball reaction like the rest of my team. Bill and I had started our doubles set on 7 and 8. The Pollard brothers, Paul Wolf and Jerry Kessler bowled doubles on 9 and 10. When the set ended, the Pollards moved to 11 and 12 to bowl their singles.

Out of all the equipment I had brought from home, I had one ball left that I had not tried to use until the 10th fill frame of our doubles set. It was a brand new out of the box Pacific Storm ball that had been mapped off by you, (Steve Kloempken). My 1st pitch was during the fill ball, last frame of the doubles and I left a 5-7, split. Bill, who was watching stated “I like that ball motion”. I laughed and said ok, what do I have to lose.

The rest is history. Moving to 5 and 6 to bowl singles, using a Pacific Storm I bowled 244, then 300,  finishing with 279 for a winning 823 series, along with my personal best 2,097 All Events total. The Pollard’s five all shot above 2040, winning and setting the new Team All Events record of 10,422, which stands today 25 years later. This is a dream that I am still living and forever thankful for.

Final thoughts on the 1999 ABC Hall of Fame Induction and more

DS: I was rooming with Ron Pollard in Las Vegas. We were there to bowl the High Roller. Somehow Steve James from the ABC had learned where I was and called me that night to congratulate me on being inducted into the HOF. What a special memory that is to this day. I was inducted in March 1999, in Syracuse, New York.

My fondest memory was of the HOF dinner night, getting to talk with Joe Norris. We sat at the bar and had a beer. His mind was still sharp. What fun it was to reminisce with him talking about his travels and fun he had bowling on his beer teams at the Nationals. He had bowled ABC’s 70 years at that point. What a history lesson I so enjoyed.

It’s the history that makes the ABC, now USBC so great. Tournaments that lose their history go down hill fast. Long live the USBC.

In closing, my final thoughts about HOF. There are two bowlers who I believe that have been passed over for HOF induction. The first is Mike Neumann. What can you say about this guy? The question is, what didn’t he win? 3 to 4 USBC titles, 2 to 3 Megabuck tournaments. (I watched Mike win the Hoinke Super Classic in Cincinnati, my hometown. He started with front 8 in the title match. It was something to see). He also won an overseas tournament in the Netherlands in 1995, (same one I bowled in 1996) and was on at least 3 or 4 National Team bowling challenge wins. There has to be a lot more that I’m missing because he was just that good.

USBC HOF committee, please review the merits of putting this guy into the HOF based on his tournament performance during his short career. He was a special talent that when he was on the lanes there were always people who wanted to watch him bowl. If his name comes up on a ballot that I am able to vote on, he has my “yes” check mark.

The second bowler is Ted Hannahs, from Zanesville Ohio. He has won a USBC title, the Petersen Classic, 4 national tour stops, countless Regional Pro tournaments, was 2nd at the 1982 ABC Masters in Baltimore, multiple National Team Challenges wins, along with countless other tournament wins since the 1970’s. He is a special talent who needs to be recognized as one of the best I got to see in my generation.

Thank you very much, Steve for spending time with me reminiscing about my past history. It was fun to think back about where I’ve been in this game. I did not bowl for the Hall of Fames or the money. I have truly loved our game since I was a young man. It’s great to think about the fun I had traveling, seeing different cities, and meeting people along the way. What a ride it’s been.


READING A BOWLING BALL BOX LABEL

  

One of the most exciting times as a bowler has come. It’s time to drill a brand-new Storm bowling ball! There’s no better feeling than walking into your pro shop to drill a new piece of equipment. The importance of choosing the right drilling is key to get the full potential of that ball. Many resources can be used to help map out the correct layout. There’s one piece of information that many bowlers overlook when researching information on their new ball. That is, of course, the label on the bowling ball box. In this article, we’ll discuss each detail on the label and how this information can help decide the correct layout.

At the top of the label, you will find the name of the ball. For this example, we featured the Storm Incite. Just under the ball number, you will find the logo image engraved on the ball. Depending on the color scheme and the name of each color of the ball, you will find the color pallet as the backdrop of the logo image. This will then be followed by something that separates Storm from other ball manufacture brands, and that is going to be the fragrance name feature on that Storm ball. The Incite features a Cherry Vanilla as the scent.

Diving into the information and specs of the ball, we are first going to give attention to the gross weight. This displays the overall weight of the undrilled ball. Just under the gross weight, you’ll find an image of the ball's core. Top weight is a term used to refer to the weight difference measured from the top half of a bowling ball compared to the bottom half of the ball. The pin distance refers to the distance between the colored pin and the CG (center of gravity) marking on the ball. In this case, the Incite has a top weight of 2.50oz and a pin distance of 2.5-3-inches. This is valuable information when deciding the layout of the ball.

Continuing down the label, we’ll find the coverstock and ball finish. For this example, the coverstock on the Storm Incite is R4S™ Hybrid Reactive finished at 3000-grit Abralon. This coverstock is wrapped around the new asymmetric Tensor™ Core. This information is followed by the RG (radius of gyration) and differential of the ball. The Incite’s RG and differential is 2.50 and 0.053 respectively in 15lbs. The next question is, what is does RG and differential mean, and how does it affect your ball reaction? Simply put, the higher the RG, the later the ball is going to hook, or transition and the lower the RG the earlier the ball is going to hook. The overall differential will affect how much the ball will hook. The higher the differential, the more the ball is going to hook.

Now we’re going to breakdown the meaning of the serial number on the ball. The first two digits represent the year the ball was manufactured followed by the three letters of the SKU (Stock Keeping Unit) of the ball. This is the individual SKU for this ball and we can track this ball in our inventory. The next character is the letter for the month. “A” represents January, “B” is February, “C” is March, and so on. The next two characters will identify the day of the month, followed by the letter representation of the engraver it was engraved on, and the final three numbers represent the ball number that came from that engraver for the day. Finally, the very bottom of the label features the barcode, website, and the ball's full SKU as the last part of the label.

Getting a new ball will always exude confidence and excitement for every bowler. With all the excitement, the question still stands: "How should I drill this ball?" Always keep in mind there’s plenty of useful material about your new ball on the box label. Before you toss that box away, be sure to utilize all the valuable information you can about your new ball.

 


Proton PhysiX vs AstroPhysiX vs PhysiX

For this test, I drilled one of each of the balls in question and used the same 4.5 x 4.5 x 2 layout across the board. It’s logical to claim they’re going to roll different, but we want to find out just how different.

I tested these balls in three different oil pattern scenarios with the thought in mind that each one would play to a particular strength of each ball. For this test, I will find the optimal line to demonstrate where I would have to play with each ball on each pattern.

Storm is in an interesting position right now. It’s producing relevant and useful bowling balls that all serve a purpose. So how does the company continue to advance the frontier of bowling ball science? Easy: always be at the drawing board. If you’re not at the drawing board, you’re not in the game. You’re something else. By standing at the edge of what is known and unknown, you can create a tried and tested quiver of covers and cores at your disposal. One thing Storm has been particularly good at over the years is evoking memories of previous balls with new releases, which will tug on the heartstrings of bowlers as they fondly remember the gear that they have used over the years.

The Proton PhysiX isn’t only the third representation of the Atomic Core, it comes from a wholly different classification of coverstocks different from its predecessors: the PhysiX and AstroPhysiX. If there wasn’t enough contrast between R2S Pearl and NRG Hybrid on the PhysiX and AstroPhysiX respectfully, throw NeX Solid into the crucible and you pretty much have yourself a full 3-ball arsenal.

As many of you probably know all too well, R2S (particularly in its pearlized form) is the cleanest, most responsive (to friction) coverstock development of this century. NRG itself has been around for nearly ten years and still performs as admirably today as it did a decade ago. When we were first deliberating amongst ourselves which cover to put on the now iconic Atomic Core, the two most noteworthy formulas of our generation were the obvious choices. In typical Storm progression a pearl, solid, and hybrid version of most core types gets introduced worldwide. But rarely, if ever, do we see three balls as diverse as the Proton PhysiX, AstroPhysiX, and PhysiX in such a short timeframe all thanks to their own contrasting chemical elements.

BOWLER STATS:

Launch Speed: 17.5mph

RPM: 450

Tilt:

Rotation: 45°

PAP: 5” straight over

Layout Used for Test: 4.5 x 4.5 x 2 (55° x 4.5 x 30°)

Surface Used: Proton PhysiX: 2000-grit, PhysiX: 3000-grit, AstroPhysiX: 1500-grit Polished

Oil Patterns: Broadway, 37’, 4.09:1, 23.25 mL; Carbon, 42', 10.36:1, 24.60 mL; Statue of Liberty, 47', 3.05:1, 24.73 mL.

 

Highlights from the test:

https://youtu.be/Z22yFF0DR_Q


THE RESULTS

On a condition I would typically use urethane, you can bet that anything will hook on this 37' 4.09:1 pattern. The trick is controlling the ball and the pocket, which is why urethane is a vital resource for anything shorter than 40', depending on lane surface and player style, of course. I did not alter any of the balls' surfaces so the Proton PhysiX stayed at 2000-grit, the PhysiX at 3000-grit, and the AstroPhysiX remained polished. Naturally, the AstroPhysiX played the furthest right with the most entry angle. The Proton naturally had the deepest laydown, but put me in a zone I'd prefer not to be in because it was simply too deep on this shorter pattern. In a perfect world, I would be using urethane on this pattern. But if all I had was reactive, I would drill a Proton PhysiX with a shorter pin, keep it dull, and stay right for as long as I could. The other two balls were just too quick when they encountered friction.

On a 42' 10.36:1 pattern, you can take your pick of what you want to roll. This type of pattern lends itself to many styles, balls, and angles of attack. With this much oil in the middle and friction to the outside, there's a clearly defined breakpoint here and it's going to be outside of 5. The Proton wasn't a bad look, but it started me too deep than I'd prefer. For my style on this pattern, smoother surfaces usually prevail. I appreciated the entry angle the AstroPhysiX was able to provide and I know that as the lanes transition I can stay in this ball the longest while still maintaining great finish down lane.

On the 47' 3.05:1 Statue of Liberty surface will be key. The two balls I would bring to tackle this pattern would surely be the PhysiX and Proton PhysiX. This type of condition is exactly what these balls were built for. As you can see from the graph above the AstroPhysiX struggled to go through the pins the proper way and probably wouldn't become an option for this pattern until very late in the day. I really had to focus on speed control just to be sure to hit the pocket with the AstroPhysiX. However, one of the niceties in the PhysiX lineup is that it's never been easier to adjust between balls. Stepping up to the PhysiX or Proton PhysiX was the obvious choice for this longer pattern.

THE BOTTOM LINE:

The most notable design feature of all three balls is their finish down lane en route back to the pocket. The Atomic Core left me in that confident state of mind where the ball is going to flare when and where I need it to. Because the PhysiX and AstroPhysiX have already been established, it’s important to note the Proton PhysiX has a specific target market of bowlers who are either beginners looking for extra help in hooking the ball, leaguers who need to blend out wet/dry, or high-level tournament players who need the teeth and flare to cut through the heavy conditions they regularly face. You can swing for the fences with this one - there’s no concern of it not making the turn back.

The colors provide instant feedback on just how quickly the Proton loses axis rotation, slows down, and gets rolling forward. This can come in especially handy because of just how strong the ball is and becomes a good indicator when it’s proper time to shell or even ball down. There’s always a bit of a trade-off with midlane read and entry angle when it comes to a ball like this, and you definitely don’t get the same sharp turn as you would on an AstroPhysiX. Understanding the design intent of each ball should make the adjustments between the two that much easier.

The Proton PhysiX was intended to make life easier for bowlers who need to dig in and create some significant motion front to back. The bottom line from this review – that is absolutely true. You can be confident that no matter which “PhysiX” you choose, it’ll have all of Storm’s best research and development technologies packed into it.


Japan's Mr. Subaru Nagano wins THREE Consecutive JPBA Events

Subaru currently works as a pro-shop staff, driller, pro staff and center operation staff for Sagamihara Park Lanes in Kanagawa prefecture.

He is in the top 10 in the JPBA point ranking last 5 years (2016/4th, 2017/9th, 2018/10th, 2019/3rd, 2020/1st) . He often appears in High Sports' ball review videos, providing the viewers with useful information about Storm & Roto Grip products with his immense knowledge.

With his trusty Axiom Pearl... photo credit: JPBA

 

photo credit: JPBA

 

photo credit: JPBA

2.5M Japanese Yen.... that's $24,000 Dollars in the United States... not a bad pay day!!!

He turned a professional at the age of 16. The youngest ever professional then attracted attention for its high-rev style. His first JPBA win finally came in the 39th Japan Open in 2016,15 years after his youngest debut.

For the Champion at the SSS Cup...photo credit: JPBA

 

Loving his Code Dynamic.... Premier Line OEM ball exclusive to Asia photo credit: JPBA
SSS Cup Champion Trophy photo credit: JPBA

 

Many amateur bowlers aspire the powerful ball reaction that 36-year old Subaru, who only weighs 63kg and stands 167cm tall, creates. With his win in three consecutive tournaments in 2020, he proved himself and the superior performance of Storm and Roto Grip products for us.

Thank you, Subaru and congratulations on the 3 consecutive wins. We look forward to your continued success.

High Sports Co., Ltd.

 


Pat Healey, Jr., a Champion Both On and Off the Lanes

WHERE ARE THEY NOW – PAT HEALEY, JR. 

 

If you followed competitive bowling throughout the 1990’s and 2000’s then you know the name Patrick Healey, Jr. In the early 90’s, among his many accomplishments, he was United States Amateur of the Year three times and the World Amateur Bowler of the Year twice. He was my doubles partner when we won the World Championships Gold Medal in 1991 and we were on the same trio’s team, along with Vince Biondo, when we won the Trios Gold Medal also at the World Championships in 1991. In fact, he nearly won the coveted PBA Tournament of Champions title as an amateur in 1995.

 

Many people remember you as a regular on the PBA Tour TV shows for several years, making nearly 30 shows over nine seasons ending in 2007. Tell us about how and when you got started with Storm.

PH: I joined the Storm staff in the fall of 2003. I was a free agent at the time. Bill Supper and Dave Symes gave me a call and invited me to be on the staff. We worked out the details. I was very honored, happy and excited to join Storm. I was a great time for us. I had a lot of success and made many t.v. shows. I won the TOC, a regular tour title and 3 regional titles with Storm equipment. In fact, I used Storm equipment through the 2006/2007 season, my last year on tour.

 

What led to your retirement from the PBA?

PH:  It was kind of strange how my career ended. I had contracted salmonella poisoning and lost 25 pounds in just a few months. At the time, the PBA Tour had deferred my exemption for the season due to my sickness, as my doctors had recommended that I not put any strain on my body as it needed time to heal. The deferment went into the next year. In the meantime, without bowling, I didn’t have a job. In the past, I had worked with Gold Coaches Fred Borden and Frank Buffa, not just on my game but alongside them in clinics and events, and they told me I had a talent for coaching. But this was just a secondary thing while I was competing, and when I had a break from the Tour, I coached full time.

So, I looked first into coaching overseas. My first coaching assignment was with Iraqi National Team. We all met in Egypt. We had a two-week camp. A month later, also in Egypt, I coached them in the Arab games. They won a bronze medal in the Women’s Team Event. It was the first medal they won in Federation History, male or female. They were very happy and I was very happy. It was a successful first dive into international competition.

At that tournament, I met the Kuwait Team Manager and that led to a 2008 head coaching assignment there. I stayed for a year. The players had a lot of success. They were young, talented and driven. In all, they won 5 gold medals, 5 silver medals and 5 bronze medals in tournament competition (GCC Championships, Arab Championships and World Championships).  They were very happy and I was very happy. It was because of the joy I had coaching and the success the players had that I decided to continue coaching in Kuwait and forgo competing on the PBA tour.

 

Wow, that’s incredible. Was coaching now your full-time focus or were you still thinking about competing?

PH:   It was strange … I thought of myself as both a coach and as a player, equally. After returning from Kuwait, I competed in a few small tournaments. I also continued coaching by giving private classes, clinics and seminars. Later that year, 2009, I decided to go to the UAE to bowl in some tournaments they ran during their Ramadan celebration. I was there 17 days and bowled in four tournaments. I remember that I bowled 125 games of competition. I bowled well and felt good. It made me serious contemplate returning to the PBA. During my time there, I was approached by the UAE federation. They asked me if I would be interested to be their head coach. We talked and I accepted the job 2 weeks later. That is when I pretty much decided that I would focus more on coaching than being a player for the rest of my life. I was the head coach there for 1 ½ years. The players were experienced and tournament tough. I had a great relationship with all of the them. They also had a lot of success. In all, they won 9 gold medals, 9 silver medals and 4 bronze medals in tournament competition (GCC Championships, Arab Championships, Asian Indoor Games and Asian Championships). One of the players was named Asian Bowler of the Year for the year 2010. They were very happy and I was very happy.

Coach Pat Healey, Jr.

After leaving UAE, I got out of coaching for a while. A couple of years went by. An opportunity arose to start a bowling academy/school in Mexico City in 2014. I had lived there prior to that and I still knew many of the bowlers there. While I was there, I was contacted by the Guatemalan Federation to see if I would be interested to help their program. It was originally planned to be part time but I ended being there for almost 1 ½ years. It was a different experience than Kuwait and UAE. This was more about teaching and instructing and developing youth players than it was focusing on winning medals and championships. A few of the players did have some tournament experience. Even though it was different, I enjoyed my time there.

 

That coaching experience took me to the end of 2015. After that, I decided that I wanted to look into something that didn’t require a lot of travel and less pressure. I started focusing on giving private classes only. During this time even though I didn’t ever work with the Mexican National Team, among the players I worked with were certain members of the national team. The players I had the opportunity to help did have success, nationally and internationally.

Then, in April 2019, I was contacted by the India Bowling Federation. They were interested in part-time help. That assignment lasted until October 2019. Even though it was a short amount of time, there was success also…. 3rd place Youth Division in the Philippine Open, 2nd place Youth Division in the Hong Kong Open and a Silver Medal in Singles at the Asian Championships.

 

Here I am now a year later and not sure what I’m going to do because of the COVID-19 virus. There is still quite a bit of risk and fear around the world. I am most definitely still interested in teaching and coaching.  Nonetheless, if another opportunity comes up in the bowling world, I will give it consideration. It has been a great pleasure for me to help players achieve their goals and experience that great joy of accomplishment. I feel very content and proud of all the players I have had a chance to work with. I would like to continue that. Once the situation becomes safer and plans can be made, I will look into my options.

 

Who were your first and early coaches?

PH: My first coach was my Dad. He taught me baseball, basketball, bowling, etc.  He had a great eye for sports. He just knew how they functioned. He didn’t know how to express what he saw all that well, though. He just knew how sports worked. I had a lot of athletic ability, played a lot of sports growing up. So, from that combination, I learned a lot from my Dad.

After high school, I went on to Wichita State University. My coaches there were all a huge influence on me. Coach Vadakin, Mark Lewis, Pat Henry, they were all big influences. And my backer, Jim Martino, wasn’t really a coach but was more of a manager; he had an aura or way about him. He was very savvy and I learned a lot from him. Then, of course, there was Fred Borden. Fred was the head coach of Team USA. I was on the team for three years (1991,1992 and 1995) and during those years I had the chance to learn a tremendous amount from Fred. He had a huge influence on my bowling and personal lives. I am extremely grateful to have had all of them as my coaches.

 

What is it about coaching that really drew you in?

PH: That’s a good question Steve. It’s a few things. One, I love helping people. I like to help people learn, get better, and I want them to improve in the sport. I’ve coached so many great students, more than 500 different players in all, through private classes, clinics and seminars in addition to my time with all the players from the national teams across the globe. Two, I want the players to experience that joy and emotion of accomplishment. Whether it be winning a gold medal or seeing their bowling ball roll down the lane exactly as they planned and striking. Or, anything in between. It gives me great joy to see my students experience that. Third, it’s about the challenge. I see what needs to be done to help a player and I make it my mission to help that player improve. I won’t leave that player until they have learned more and improved. I think that comes from my competitive nature and the idea that I won’t quit.

 

What did it mean to you to hear that you were being inducted into the USBC Hall of Fame? 

PH: I have been blessed to have been so successful in bowling. Being inducted into the USBC Hall of Fame is the pinnacle for me. It is the greatest accomplishment and honor of my bowling life. It means the world to me to be included with such great names in the sport of bowling. It has validated all the sacrifices I made and all the hard work I put in.

 

What are your plans for competing again on the lanes? The PBA50 Tour or maybe some of the USBC Senior events? 

PH: I would like to bowl on the PBA50 tour. Even the regular tour again from time to time. That is my goal. I miss bowling and the competition. It will depend on how my right shoulder/neck area improves. It feels better so I am hopeful to start bowling once the restrictions are lifted due to COVID 19. Regardless if I can bowl on the tour again or not, I would like to continue with instructing and coaching. It gives me a different type of joy and sense of accomplishment helping others improve and achieve their goals in bowling. If something else comes up that inspires me, I will look into that.

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Bowling Ball Motion: The Basics

There are many variables that can affect the way your ball rolls, but why should you care? Some are related to the way you release it and your unique delivery. Other variables can be credited to that evil lane man and how he conditions the lane. Then there are factors that are above and beyond anyone’s control, and, no matter how hard you try, you cannot change them. We are going to discuss the subtle distinctions in how you roll the ball and what you can control in your game that play a bigger role than you might think. Understanding these characteristics will help you in choosing your next ball and, furthermore, help your pro shop operator decide a layout for your brand new toy.

https://youtu.be/lh0nWHT9p4I


WHAT IS SURFACE?

The chemical composition in conjunction with the surface preparation of the coverstock matters greatly. A solid coverstock with a low grit surface texture will lose speed at a higher rate than a polished, pearlized coverstock. Friction reduces ball speed, so this actuality is highly linear with that of wood lanes or lanes that have not been oiled in a long time. Harder lane materials usually require more ball surface whilst softer lanes demand less ball surface. Fact: You will never meet a professional bowler of today that dislikes a good amount of texture on their ball. Why? Not only do they recognize the fact that when a ball rolls into the pocket it carries significantly better than a ball that skids into the pocket, but it also reduces the vast majority of any over/under reaction tendencies; a bowler’s worst nightmare. Not saying polish on a ball is a bad thing by any means, just that there's a time and place for both and it's the bowler's responsibility to know when to use it.

WHAT IS SPEED?

Bowlers with high ball speeds and without the revs to match can be considered “speed dominant.” They will typically favor more aggressive surfaces and layouts to help their ball pick up sooner on the lane. “Rev dominant” players with slower ball speeds typically like less aggressive balls, layouts, and surfaces to help prevent their ball from overreacting. Did you know that your ball decelerates as it travels down the lane? Depending on its surface, it can lose 3-5mph every shot. So, when you see the speedometer clock your ball on the scoring monitor, it’s taking that measurement down by the pins, not at your release.

WHAT IS REV RATE?

Rev rate is a calculation of the amount of revolutions a bowler imparts on a ball. The common unit used is revolutions per minute, or RPM. Over the years, bowlers have generalized the RPM gamut into three categories: stroker, tweener, and cranker. Understanding your rev rate (and its relationship with your speed, axis tilt/rotation) is important because it helps to categorize your specific needs as a bowler. Knowing what type of ball to buy, what techniques need to be applied, or the type of wrist device needed all depend heavily on your rev rate.

WHAT IS AXIS TILT?

Axis tilt is the vertical angle at which the ball rotates. Commonly known as spin, axis tilt is determined by the position of the thumb during the release. If the hand turns too early, the thumb exits on top of the ball. Bowlers with a high degree of axis tilt will be able to see the top of their hand during the release and follow through. The resultant path of a ball with a higher degree of axis tilt is extended and the amount of backend potential is reduced. Oily lanes become quite difficult when the core is rotating in a vertical fashion but is actually favored on drier lanes. Being able to have the thumb exit at the bottom of the forward swing minimizes axis tilt. The lower the axis tilts, the sooner the ball will enter its roll phase before making impact with the pins.

WHAT IS AXIS ROTATION?

Axis rotation is the horizontal measure of the angle of the ball’s revolutions, and much like axis tilt, it is also determined by the bowler’s release. Axis rotation is commonly known today as side roll. When the ball has no axis rotation, the fingers exited directly underneath the ball at the 6 o’clock position. End-over-end roll (0° of axis rotation) removes all hook potential from the ball regardless of the amount of revolutions, speed, or lane conditions. High amounts of axis rotation (90° of rotation) will cause the ball to skid further, but unlike axis tilt, will cause an intense hook angle at the breakpoint. Players with high amounts of axis rotation will favor drier lanes, and lower amounts of axis rotation usually like more oil. Higher amounts of friction will cause the ball to lose axis rotation at higher rates. Initial axis rotation, ball speed, axis tilt, and lane friction all dictate when side revolutions become end-over-end revolutions. Generally speaking, balls skid, then hook, then roll. Less rotation will shorten the skid phase and get the ball into the hook phase earlier, while maximum rotation will extend the skid phase of the ball and increase its hook potential down lane. Manipulating your axis rotation is a valuable tool because it will change the ball’s reaction while still allowing you to stay in the same part of the lane and use the same break point. Ideally, you would like to limit lateral moves on the lane because it forces you to make multiple adjust­ments with speed, tilt, etc. and often, particularly on challenging conditions, the zone you’re going to have to play and the break point are pretty defined.


Through practice, you can alter or enhance your ball speed, rev rate, axis tilt, and axis rotation. The best bowlers in the world have the ability to manipulate any and/or all of these at a moment’s notice. Furthermore, having a solid understanding of surface and when to use it is equally as essential. Technology of the sport today only enhances the subtleties of your game. Rubber balls and wooden surfaces did not place an emphasis on shot making versatility. Ball technology and oil patterns of the modern era force quick-changing conditions and different parts of the lane to be utilized that were not in play thirty years ago. Knowing your roll is more important now than ever before.


STORM AND X OUT BREAST CANCER RAISE MORE THAN $140K FOR THE HUNTSMAN CANCER INSTITUTE

This year, 1,735,350 new cancer cases are expected to be diagnosed in the United States.

Throughout the bowling season, the Storm Nation community comes together to raise funds and build awareness for cancer research.  With the help of the bowling community and a generous donation from the Chrisman Foundation, Storm Products presented a donation of $112,599 to Huntsman Cancer Foundation while continuing to spread awareness for a cause that affects millions.

An additional donation of $30,000 was donated from the Striking Against Breast Cancer Foundation was presented by Donna Conners and Carol Norman. Conners who hosts the Storm PBA/PWBA Striking Against Breast Cancer Mixed Doubles Tournament each summer, and Norman, traveled to Utah for the presentation.

“Storm has always been known for innovation and Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) shows the same spirit in their dedication to the creation and improvement of cancer treatments,” Barbara Chrisman, co-owner of Storm Products said. “With our fans support, through the purchase of our PTLP products, Striking Against Breast Cancer and The Chrisman Foundation's funds we are able to sponsor several treatment rooms in The Kathryn F. Kirk Center for Comprehensive Cancer Care and Women’s Cancers at HCI. The donor plaques on the wall specifically identify that bowling and bowlers care about them.  I truly hope people who are going through the treatment and doing the suffering through this terrible disease know that someone cares and feel something positive through the support from the bowling community from around the world.”

This total donation of $142,599 will continue to improve quality of life for individuals and their families who may experience a cancer diagnosis.  HCI hosts more than 142,000 patient visits annually at its Salt Lake City and community clinic locations. It also serves the largest geographic region of all cancer centers, covering Utah, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, and Wyoming.

The 2019 Paint the Lanes Pink™ campaign featured 300 Limited-Edition !Q Tour 20™  bowling balls, a joint venture between Storm and X Out Breast Cancer to help celebrate the 20th Anniversary of the famous Striking Against Breast Cancer Bowling Tournament held annually in Houston, TX. In addition, we raise funds through our dedicated PTLP products in the Storm Shop which raise funds and build awareness for breast cancer research year-round.

About Storm Products, Inc.

Storm Products Inc. continues to lead the bowling industry in innovation through our high-performance bowling equipment featuring the Storm and Roto Grip Brands.

About Huntsman Cancer Foundation

Huntsman Cancer Foundation’s sole purpose is to raise funds to support the mission of Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI):  To understand cancer from its beginnings, to use that knowledge in the creation and improvement of cancer treatments, to relieve the suffering of cancer patients, and to provide education about cancer risk, prevention, and care.  Huntsman Cancer Foundation is dedicated to ensuring excellence in these endeavors through the development and prudent stewardship of private resources. All HCI fundraising initiatives happen through Huntsman Cancer Foundation, which is a public, functionally integrated, Type 3 501 (c)(3).

 


Omega Crux 6 Ways

Watch the video, then read what our employees have to say about it below!

(We're bowlers too, ya know)

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tU1-9QhhoR4

 

THE CAST:

-In order of appearance-


"The Omega Crux is a ball that I’ve been missing in my arsenal. I was recently refit and have been rebuilding my bags. I like to play straight up the lane, and I throw balls with more confidence when I can miss a little to the right or left with a ball. I also like smooth shapes like an !Q Tour, PRO-Motion, and the Roto Grip IDOL. My favorite pearl asymmetric ball was the Snap Lock and I’ve been looking for a ball that I can trust like I did with it. After a few shots out with the Omega Crux, I quickly realized this was a ball I knew I’d like to throw. In the video, you can see I missed pretty severely on one shot and it still shaped up and struck. I threw it in my weekly league and had the front 10 with it during the second game. I could trust that as long as I got it to the right spot down lane, it would find the pocket. This layout is great for me too because it allows me to stay to the right longer without having to move left."

-Blair Blumenscheid, Communications

 

"The Crux line has been one of my favorites since the original Crux. I see the Omega Crux as a great option when I need to move left and still get the ball back to the pocket.Don’t be fooled, this ball has some teeth, and can make the straightest players move to the middle of the lane, or further!"

-Matt Martin, Senior Designer

 


 

"The perfect blend of coverstock and core shape to give big motion off the spot. I drilled it like my favorite Physix and it was a little sooner and more overall hook than the Physix. Great ball for  flatter, higher volume patterns for me."

-Hank Boomershine, VP Sales/R&D

 


"What more can I say about this ball that Kris Prather didn’t already say himself on TV. It’s super aggressive and allowed me to play multiple angles while creating some amazing pin carry. In fact, for my first 12 shots with it (on camera), I rolled a perfect game with three distinct angles of attack. It’s incredible."

-Steve Kloempken, VP Marketing

 


 

"I was immediately impressed because this ball allowed me to play multiple angles of attack while maintaining optimal pin carry. This is a true testament of how reliable and predictable the Catalyst weight block is and has been for years. The name speaks for itself!

-Kendle Miles, Technical Service Representative

 


"I usually favor knocking the shine off of my pearl balls, and this one comes pre-surfaced to my exact preference! I get both the float through the fronts and the backend traction I need thanks to the GI-20 coverstock. Not to mention the Catalyst Core maintains its integrity better than most asymmetricals thanks to its vertical cavity in the center. I know what I'm getting every time I put a hole in one."

-Chad McLean, Technical Director

 


 Storm employs a full-time, responsive technical team ready to answer any questions you have about the Omega Crux or any other Storm product. Please call (800) 369-4402 (Mon-Fri, 8am-5pm MST) or send an email to tech@stormbowling.com (anytime).


First SYC Champions of 2020 Named in Las Vegas

BRIGHAM CITY, Utah - The first event of the 2020 SYC Tour was held in Las Vegas, Nevada, February 15-17, 2020. A total of 210 youth bowlers from 25 different states traveled to compete at the South Point Bowling Plaza. Youth bowlers competed in three five-game rounds on three different Kegel patterns in six different divisions determined by gender and age (U20 Boys, U20 Girls, U15 Boys, U15 Girls, U12 Boys, U12 Girls) for a national title and a portion of the $17,850 scholarship fund.

“While the Storm Youth Championships awards talented champions, the event is a truly a collection of moments spent with family and friends building memories and raising funds for a worthy charity,” Gary Hulsenberg, Vice President of Business Development at Storm Products said. “The weekend is about spending time together, learning, and having fun throughout the competition.”

The format of the SYC rewards consistency and the overall champions are decided based on the 15 game total pinfall. After two days of competition, six smiling youth athletes are proud to claim their SYC trophies.

L to R: Brianna Archabal (U12G), Katelyn Abigania (U15G), Jennifer Loredo (U20G), Henry Hind (U12B), Bud Sicard (U15B), Jorell Morris (U20B).

The U12 division at the SYC is filled with athletes bursting with energy, excitement, and enthusiasm for the sport. Brianna Archabal, of Idaho, found her SYC entry wrapped up under her Christmas tree from her parents. She promised them that she would practice and prepare for this event. She has been practicing between 20-25 games a week since November and her dedication paid off when she claimed the U12 girls trophy. In the U12 boys division, Henry Hind, of Tennessee, has traveled to several SYC and he always has the best questions for the SYC staff. His desire to soak up knowledge is contagious, and he has finished as a runner-up three times at the SYC. Over the weekend, he proved to be the most consistent across the three patterns and was able to claim his first SYC title.

In the U15 girls division, Katelyn Abigania, of California, is constantly working to improve her game as she continues to grow into a bright young lady. She was the only repeat SYC champion crowned in Las Vegas. Averaging 212 across the 15 games of competition, she earned her third SYC title. In the U15 boys division, Bud Sicard, of Oregon, commanded the medium pattern averaging 252.6. He rolled a 299 game in the third game of the block and was greeted with many cheers, high fives, and fellow competitors after his twelfth shot of the game. He maintained his consistency throughout the other blocks and was rewarded with his first SYC title.

The U20 division is filled with so much talent and ambition. The athletes are truly refining their skills but still continuing to learn every time they step on the approach. In the U20 girls division, Jennifer Loredo, of California, who has committed to bowl for Vanderbilt University in the fall took home her first SYC title. She bowled a 289 game in the final game of the event to solidify her overall gold medal. Jorell Morris, of California, earned a medal on every SYC condition averaging 243.6 for the entire event to take home the U20 boys title. This was his first SYC title.

In addition to the overall champions, the top three bowlers in each division were presented a gold, silver, or bronze medal after each round.

The Medalists on the KEGEL Short Pattern: U12 Boys – Henry Hind (gold), Braden McDonough (silver), Brek Strobel (bronze). U12 Girls – Malorie Denney (gold), Brianna Archabal (silver), Arden Han Wei (bronze). U15 Boys– Harley Shene (gold), Bud Sicard (silver), Micah Voorhis (bronze). U15 Girls– Katelyn Abigania (gold), Saphyre Nofuente (silver), Morgan Kline (bronze). U20 Boys– Jorell Morris (gold), Ashton Yamasaki (silver), Tyler Weitzman (bronze). U20 Girls– Melanie Katen (gold), Jennifer Loredo (silver), Brooklyn Gagnon (bronze).

The Medalists on the KEGEL Medium Pattern: U12 Boys – Braden McDonough (gold), Henry Hind (silver), Roman Caporale (bronze). U12 Girls – Brianna Archabal (gold), Bella Castillo (silver), Payton Day (bronze). U15 Boys– Bud Sicard (gold), Elias O'Hollaren (silver), Michael Hawk (bronze). U15 Girls– Katelyn Abigania (gold), Avery Domaguin (silver), Stephanie Hong (bronze). U20 Boys– Charles Bostic (gold), Jorell Morris (silver), Julian Michael Salinas (bronze). U20 Girls– Jennifer Loredo (gold), Melanie Katen (silver), Samantha Conti (bronze).

The Medalists on the KEGEL Long Pattern: U12 Boys – Ernesto Reynoso (gold), Roman Caporale (silver), Henry Hind (bronze). U12 Girls – Brianna Archabal (gold), Hana Sangalang (silver), Malorie Denney (bronze). U15 Boys– Micah Voorhis (gold), Mac Kaurin (silver), Elias O'Hollaren (bronze). U15 Girls– Kayla Starr (gold), Avery Domaguin (silver), Olivia Phillips (bronze). U20 Boys– Jorell Morris (gold), Charles Bostic (silver), Travis Zimmer (bronze). U20 Girls– Jennifer Loredo (gold), Caroline Thesier (silver), Melanie Katen (bronze).

Overall Medalists: U12 Boys – Henry Hind (gold), Braden McDonough (silver), Brek Strobel (bronze). U12 Girls – Brianna Archabal (gold), Malorie Denney (silver), Bella Castillo (bronze). U15 Boys– Bud Sicard (gold), Elias O'Hollaren (silver), Micah Voohis (bronze). U15 Girls– Katelyn Abigania (gold), Avery Domaguin (silver), Kayla Starr (bronze). U20 Boys– Jorell Morris (gold), Charles Bostic (silver), Julian Michael Salinas (bronze). U20 Girls– Jennifer Loredo (gold), Melanie Katen(silver), Caroline Thesier (bronze).

Two SYC bowlers, Elias O'Hollaren and Travis Zimmer, rolled their first USBC sanctioned 300 games on the KEGEL Long Pattern.

Throughout the weekend participants and their families were able to attend seminars, learn fitness fundamentals from PWBA Champion and USBC Hall of Fame member, Kelly Kulick. Every bowler who entered the tournament received a Storm !Q Tour Emerald bowling ball to add to their tournament arsenal and were given the opportunity to have it drilled at the South Point Pro Shop.

Charitable giving continues to be a focus for the Storm Youth Championships. A donation of $10 from each entry goes directly to BVBC also known as Ballard vs. the Big “C.” BVBC raises funds for continued research in cancer treatment, specifically in head, neck, and throat cancer through the sport of bowling. BVBC also raises money for nutritional supplements and treatments for those going through the cancer journey. The Ballard Family was on site to host a BVBC silent auction, raffles and more throughout the weekend.

This tournament would not be possible without the support of our sponsors; Storm, Roto Grip, Logo Infusion, Kegel, 3G Shoes, and Bowlers Journal International. The event was livestreamed throughout the two days of competition on the Storm Bowling Facebook Page. Scores were updated live through the official scoring system of the Storm Youth Championships, BowlMetrix.

There will be a total of eight events scheduled for the 2020 Tour. The next state visited on the 2020 SYC Tour will be Minnesota on April 18-19. Entries will open on February 24 at Noon MST. For more information about our upcoming events visit our website, http://www.stormbowling.com/syc.

About Storm Products, Inc.

Storm Products Inc. continues to lead the bowling industry in innovation through our high-performance bowling equipment featuring the Storm and Roto Grip Brands.

About Ballard vs. The Big “C” (BVBC)

BVBC was created out of love for PBA Hall-of-Famer, Del Ballard, Jr., who has survived his battle with tonsil cancer. Since forming, BVBC has raised over $200,000 to help raises funds for continued research in cancer treatment, specifically in head, neck, and throat cancer. For more information visit http://www.ballardvsthebigc.org.

 

 


Tyler Jensen Named Chief Business Development Officer - Asia

BRIGHAM CITY, Utah – Storm Products, Inc. announced today that Tyler Jensen will return to Storm Products as the Chief Business Development Officer in Asia. In his new role, Jensen will continue to maintain our international relationships in Asia and Australia while directing sourcing for products for Storm Products, Roto Grip, and Global Manufacturing.

“The territory has grown too big for one person to handle,” Bill Chrisman, Chief Executive Officer of Storm Products, said. “I’ve been searching for many years for someone who has the desire and knowledge to assist Robert Dong. Tyler enjoys traveling and fostering relationships with the international community. We have come to an agreement and will work together to continue to grow the expanding territory.”

Jensen’s experience in the industry began when he was 16 and opened his first pro shop. He dedicated himself to servicing his customers and mastering the craft. He also became a PBA Member and collected 15 PBA Regional Titles. In 2005, Hall of Fame Members, Del Ballard and Carolyn Dorin-Ballard, asked Jensen to manage their first bowling store, Ballard’s Bowling Solutions. He visited Storm Headquarters for the first time in 2005 and was offered the opportunity to work as a Storm Regional Sales Manager for the South Central Territory. He spent 12 years building relationships, educating bowlers about products, and visiting pro shops throughout his territory.  In 2017, Jensen was chosen to serve as Vice President of Dexter Bowling where he has spent the past three years overseeing all parts of the business.

“I’m thankful to Dexter and HH Brown for letting me experience every aspect of manufacturing, marketing and management of such a strong brand. I’m also honored that Mr. Chrisman trusted me to bring me back onto the team.” Jensen said. “I’m very excited. I have spent a lot of time building relationships domestically and internationally. I look forward to expanding those to many more.”

In addition to sourcing and managing relationships, his responsibilities will include tournament, staff, special events, and creating new business for the territory. He will work closely with Robert Dong to continue the growth of the brand in the Asian bowling community.

About Storm Products, Inc.

Storm Products Inc. continues to lead the bowling industry in innovation through our high-performance bowling equipment featuring the Storm and Roto Grip Brands.